HROC 2017 Suburban HOT Track 2

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NON-STANDPIPE OPTIONS FOR EXTERIOR HALLWAY HIGH RISE BUILDINGS

Apartment buildings, condominiums and hotels in Southern Atlantic and Gulf Coast states commonly have exterior hallways, aka. “catwalks”. This gives firefighters the option of not using standpipes; which may be the best option, when a fire is on a lower floor and apparatus can get near the building. Consider that there are times when hoisting or lowering a hose line can be faster and more reliable than stretching from a standpipe. Also consider that standpipe components in exterior hallway buildings in coastal areas may be unreliable due to corrosion from exposure to salt air. This class was developed for firefighters in Southern states where exterior hallway residential buildings are common. It will examine conditions when not using a standpipe is indicated. It will also examine methods of lowering hose lines from upper floors to an apparatus or gated wye, hoisting hose with a rope and stretching through an adjoining apartment or hotel room. It is intended for firefighters and company officers.
BIO: Bill Gustin is a 40-year veteran of the Fire Service and a captain with the Miami-Dade (FL) Fire Rescue Department. He began his fire service career in the Chicago area and conducts firefighting training programs in the United States, Canada and the Caribbean. He is a contributing editor and an editorial advisory board member for Fire Engineering and an advisory board member for FDIC.
HIGH RISE FIRE OPERATIONS FOR FLORIDA, GULF COAST AND SOUTHERN ATLANTIC STATES
This class will the examine problems, strategic considerations and tactics for fighting fires in coastal “sunbelt” hotels, apartment buildings and condominiums including:
*How a large population of elderly residents make a protect in place strategy almost a necessity.
*How to implement a protect in place strategy.
*Why every priority is secondary to getting the first-attack hose line into operation.
*Problems presented and methods and techniques to penetrate laminated impact-resistant “hurricane” glass.
* How sprinklers and air conditioning in warm climates cause reverse stack effect and smoke stratification
*How to use the Florida “region “key for elevator firefighter’s service
The class will also examine the following topics:
*Hose line selection; conditions when a 1 3/4in. hose is appropriate and effective and conditions when there is no substitute for a 2 1/2in. hose
* A fool-proof method of determining the length of hose necessary to reach and penetrate the fire area.
*Determining the amount of firefighters necessary to advance a charged hose line and where to position them
* Methods for extending hose lines at the standpipe and at the nozzle

*Why door control is critical and how police or security personnel can ruin your day.
*Methods for improvising a “portable standpipe”
*Examining various hose bundles and how to deploy them.
* The purpose and function of pressure-reducing valves and why they may be a disaster waiting to happen.
*Why static pressure is meaningless when judging the effectiveness of a hose lines stream
*Differences in commercial and residential high rise buildings
*”Forcible exit” from elevators
*Sprinkler, standpipe and smoke control systems
*Case histories of high rise fires that resulted in civilian and firefighters line of duty deaths.

BIO: Bill Gustin is a 44-year veteran of the Fire Service and a captain with the Miami-Dade (FL) Fire Rescue Department. He began his fire service career in the Chicago area and conducts firefighting training programs in the United States, Canada and the Caribbean. He is a contributing editor and an editorial advisory board member for Fire Engineering and an advisory board member for FDIC.

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