Exponential Engine “Fire Streams”

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Fire Streams and the Exponential Engine

By: Brian Brush

http://www.FireByTrade.com

As of late I have been fielding a lot of questions regarding apparatus set up and nozzle selection. It is encouraging to see such an interest in one of our professional foundations. I believe it means that firefighters are taking greater ownership in decisions which may have been more recently dictated to their departments by savvy vendors. I enjoy assisting firefighters work through nozzle studies and flow testing because I know the value of these processes to a department and its members.

In 2005 my department conducted a year-long fire stream and nozzle study; the information collected and changes made as a result of it have made our operations more efficient and our operators more knowledgeable. Since that study I have been fortunate enough to train and network with firefighters from around the country and at the highest levels of education and experience in engine company operations. I am still very much a student of the game and continue to learn on a daily basis. With that said there seems to be recurring questions in many of contacts I have had lately. I believe that I may be better able to answer them to the masses rather than one at a time. So settle in for a little bit of rambling or pick off sections that you are seeking.

Fire Streams P2

Fire Streams

IFSTA will tell you that a fire stream is the “Stream of water or other extinguishing agent after it leaves the fire hose until it reaches the desired target.” To me this is too narrow of a view on the fire stream. The stream of water leaving the fire hose on its way to the target is the end result of a system from the source to the nozzle. If a group or department wants to evaluate their fire streams they must be willing to analyze all parts of that system for influence and change. If you are given the chance to lead or be a part of a fire stream evaluation process or nozzle study you will fail the opportunity if you get trapped in a smooth bore versus fog focus.

Link Below is to full article.

 Fire Streams and the Exponential First Due Engine Company

Anyone looking to evaluate their current nozzle selection and Engine Setup should read this article. County Fire Tactics fully agrees and supports the above article by Brian Brush.

Brian Brush’s article on the Exponential Engine is right on the mark.

We have added an Engine Company Operations page on this site and has Dennis Legear’s articles on Hose & Nozzle Dreams. They too are a must read.

Videos below from Gallons Per Second Program

On-Duty Checklist “The IDIOTS of the Fire Service”

When reporting to the firehouse, are you ready for a shift change FIRE? Have you prepared for the FIRE that will happen just as you relieve the off going firefighter? We must look at a Tour Of Duty/24 Hour Watch in the firehouse like a marathon. We must show up READY! You just don’t wake up one day and say, I’m going to run a marathon today. No, you train, train, and train some more. You prepare and plan out all 26 MILES, just as you should be training for the marathon that will happen while On-Duty. It doesn’t happen every watch, but it does happen, and usually on a  day when you least expect it.

photoAre you ready for the early morning/shift change fire? Are you scrambling when the tones drop? Do you put your gear next to the rig first thing? This could be your first call of the day….

You walk in the door and tell the off going firefighter sitting at the kitchen table  “I Got Ya”, and a minute later you get toned out for the worst fire of your career. The question is, did this firefighter already store his or her gear away in their locker, and have you even gotten your gear out of your locker before saying “I Got Ya”?  Are you ready for the early morning/shift change fire? Are you scrambling when the tones drop? Do you put your gear next to the rig first thing? This could be your first call of the day…

This job is for REAL, and is not very forgiving when you fail to prepare and take it seriously. You must respect your fellow brothers and sisters, and the civilians that are relying on you to be READY! Being ready to be On-Duty, starts before you arrive at the firehouse, it starts when you decide to be a firefighter, and chose a career to SERVE OTHERS!!

On-Duty Checklist for 2015

1. Do you eat properly the night before your watch?

2. Do you properly hydrate?

3. Do you get a good nights sleep or were you up all night at your SIDE JOB?

4. Do you shower and shave before leaving the house?

5. Do you show up in uniform, or get to work early so you can be in uniform?

6. Do you go straight to your gear and put it next to the rig?

7. Do you ask for a proper pass down before you say “I Got Ya”?

8. Once you say “I Got Ya” do you start checking the rig or eat breakfast first?

9. Do you confirm your SCBA is FULL and READY?? Actually turn it on and breathe from it?

10. Do you confirm your 911 System works?? That would be your portable radio!

The above 10 steps should be completed before the off going firefighter even leaves the firehouse..

If you are a Firefighter and you are overweight, WHAT ARE YOU DOING ABOUT IT??
We do not care about EXCUSES….. Manage what you eat and burn more calories.
I have watched the BIGGEST LOSER, and it can be D O N E!!!  If you are overweight, everyone sees you and wonders if you will be able to get the job done at crunch time. The majority of LODDs are from firefighters being overweight and out of shape. If you are overweight and are spending you’re time talking about those that are trying to make the fire service better, you are an IDIOT!!  The definition of IDIOT is a person considered stupid, foolish, or ignorant.

If you are in shape and take this job seriously, THANK YOU!

The link below is an article I wrote a while back. I am very proud that I did not succumb to the IDIOT mentality.  If you are a young firefighter and love this job, please do not give up. Do not let those that view working at the Fire Department as JUST a JOB keep you from training and doing the right thing. Just because they come in to work with a three day beard and sit at the kitchen table for hours before putting their gear next the rig, doesn’t make it right. Even if they have 20 years on the job, it just means they are a 20 year IDIOT. If you are a firefighter and your Company Officer doesn’t wear their gear, or gets off the rig on fire calls without an SCBA, they are an IDIOT. You must make a mental note of all the IDIOTS you work with for your own SAFETY.

http://countyfiretactics.com/2014/02/24/the-new-yorker-urban-legend/

Curt Isakson

Command Officer Boot Camp

BCCommand Officer Boot Camp 2015

Command, Control, and Leadership Conference

May 5, 6, & 7, 2015

Pensacola Beach

How do you carry? Do you always have it? Do you carry extra battery on you? See how the RIT OFFICER has it Hanging Ready to go.

Front Yard Leadership and How to Lead High Performers!

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Chief Todd Edwards will cover Situational Awareness

Lost and found

The term Situational Awareness is so often used, that it has almost become a “catch phrase”, rather than skill that should be practiced and trained upon. The fire service and the fire ground are ever changing and the need for both our Company Officers, as well as our Chief Officers to learn and maintain Situational Awareness is critical to success and in some cases our survival!

This course is designed to provide all students a different perspective of what Situational Awareness is and how it applies to more than just the “Big Fires”. Students will both learn and experience that when Situational Awareness is lost, the effects can be devastating! Students will be involved in open and frank discussion, case studies with radio traffic, and be provided a common sense approach on how to develop an overall skill that can be applied each and every shift. This class includes an in depth look at how we can develop these skills, a simplified size-up approach, and training aspects that any Firefighter, Officer, or Chief can utilize.

About the Instructor: Todd Edwards is a 33 year veteran of the fire service. Starting at 16 years old in Mad River Township, Ohio as a Cadet. Todd was hired by the Atlanta Fire-Rescue Department in 1988 and worked his way through the ranks. Todd is currently a Battalion Chief, assigned to Battalion-3, covering the entire Downtown corridor. Todd has always been actively involved in all aspects of the departments training and is the lead instructor for both the Acting Officer in Charge Program, as well as the Battalion Chief Command School. Todd is the lead Instructor for the Walton County Fire-Rescue Department, a combination department covering over 300 square miles east of the city. Todd also provides training throughout the state of Georgia and serves as an adjunct instructor for the state fire academy. Todd holds numerous state and national certifications and continues is education today.

This three day conference will cover: from the firehouse to the streets of your district and how to command the most efficient crew or battalion. What does an Officer and/or Chief really need to focus on to succeed in today’s Fire Service? We will cover and discuss these topics and much more in a three day Boot Camp to help even the most experienced Fire Officer and/or get the most recently promoted Boss off to a Great Start!

Topics:

  1. Fire Service Leadership
  2. Setting Standards early on and building on them
  3. Training “Real World Company/Battalion Training”
  4. Building Command Presence and Respect
  5. Understanding the Battle Field in Command Terms
  6. Understanding the Enemy and how it effects Strategy
  7. When should you SWEAT the SMALL stuff?
  8. How to build your own Rules of Engagement
  9. Mentorship “Up and Down”
  10. The other Company/Battalion and how it relates to you
  11. Commanding the 1st Alarm and Greater Alarm Fires

Multiple Speakers over the three days.

Chief Todd Edwards, Atlanta Fire

BC Curt Isakson, Battalion Chief  Escambia County

BC Shannon Stone, Battalion Chief  Fort Walton Beach

Fire Chief Rick Talbert, South Walton Fire

Fire Chief Jonathan Kanzigg, Midway Fire

Fire Chief Ken Perkins, Fort Walton Beach Fire

We have two other BIG Speakers that will be announced at a later date.

Numerous other Guest Speakers that will not disappoint…

Register for Command School at www.countyfiretactics.com  under links or https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=F4BEBHPE889HL

The Courage to be I N S I D E! “What are your Priorities?”

HROC Track Options for Thursday December 4

Firefighter Track

“Lead Lt. Ray McCormack”

The Firefighter Track will be a bus ride to the local Fire Academy for a FULL DAY of Hands-On Training Lead by Lt. Ray McCormack and assisted by Chief Bob Morris, Captain Kevin Story, Lt. Mike Ciampo, Chief Matt Negedly, Firefighter Jim Smith and numerous others. Air packs will be provided where needed. Please bring a $10 donation for the Midway Professional Firefighters who will be providing snacks, hydration, and a Great Lunch!

Suburban High Rise Track

“Lead Captain Bill Gustin”

The SHRT will be held at the Hilton and start promptly at 07:30 in the classroom. The class will  transition to Hands-On by 08:30 utilizing the stairwells and fixed fire protection systems. This class will cover pumping the system and alternative stretches for coastal type high rise, utilizing suburban staffing. There will be an opportunity to use 1.75″, 2″, and 2.5″ hose off the standpipe.

Urban High Rise Track

“Lead Chief McGrail”

The UHRT will also be held at the Hilton and start promptly at 07:30 in the classroom. You will proceed to utilizing the elevators and stairs to two floors below where you will hook up and go up utilizing 2.5″ hose and Urban High Rise Tactics. This is a full day of Hands-On with a Team of instructors from the Mile High City.

Command Track

The Command Track will be co-taught by Chief Kolomay, Chief Hoff, Chief Tracy, and Captain Cerillo. These four instructors have extensive experience in standpipe/high rise type buildings and have taught across America. They will start the day in the classroom and finish the day with multiple rotations of walking through the 18 story hotel covering Commamd considerations and what the firefighters will be up against when command is in the lobby/control room. This is more than just sit in a classroom all day. You will be one step out of the classroom. I highly recommend anyone who could be in command of a HR Fire to consider choosing this track.

Advanced Engine Operations/Engine Operations at High Rise Fires “Class starts at 08:30 and ends at 1600. This is the only class that completes in time for someone trying to catch a flight on Thursday evening. Class Instructors are Dennis Legear and Kyle Smith. Both are highly experienced in Engine Operations.

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You will be able to pick your track on Monday afternoon or Tuesday morning. Each Track is limited in size, so first come, first pick. Recommend trying to choose Monday afternoon or early Tuesday morning.