Tactical Safety for Firefighters- Facebook Firefighting

Ray

Tactical Safety for Firefighters

F A C E B O O K
F I R E F I G H T I N G

The tactics used by Facebook firefighters vary almost mirroring the real fire service. I say almost because what often gets hit hardest is not the adz end of the halligan but the keyboard of ones digital device. Facebook firefighting is always safe even when you let it all hang out, your worst injury suffering an unfriending. Let’s not forget flash mobs of outrage which of course are much less injurious than a flashover even if you don’t detect it coming. For improved awareness become a student of Facebook behavior which of course is always modern.

Fighting fire via Facebook is very convenient too because even with a pause for your enlightened reply the fire doesn’t die. Profiling which is shunned by most is often the center piece of survivability odds makers and extolled by many FBFD members as good stuff. I wish those same firefighters could guess the stock market too, that would be rich.

There is so much experience at the ends of many hands in fact All Hands. The outgrowth of social media equality, everyone is an expert at least at an inch deep. No finger pointing here I will save that for my instructor photo and my keyboard. Have a gonger of a time and remember no bunker gear cleaning is necessary as a Facebook firefighter, no matter how many J O B S you take in.

By Ray McCormack
Keep
Fire
In
Your
Life

Tactical Safety for Firefighters- Staffing Reach

Ray

Tactical Safety for Firefighters
Staffing Reach

We hear all about the issues of staffing in the fire service: its limitations and its benefits. First things first! Your staffing is your staffing and typically doesn’t change much except for the variable of the alarm assignment strength. Volunteer response is a deployment model that tends to have more radical staffing swings. So now, what are you doing about this “given” when it comes to community fire protection?

Is your staffing commensurate with your buildings? Are your hosebeds assisting your handline deployments? Are you able to check the boxes and perform interior attack? Comparisons between what is perceived as ideal staffing and minimal staffing is not the point.

The question should be is staffing adequate for the majority of your fire attack incidents? This is a critical need and should be looked at critically. Interior fire attack is handled by a nozzle firefighter who should have a backup firefighter assisting with that nozzle function and advancement. Fire extinguishment also needs to be supervised by an officer. That’s three people. Can we do it with more? Sure, add a firefighter further back to assist with line movement.

The bottom line is that this is the model. You may or may not have a complete version of it, but that only cuts you so much slack. If you switch roles or you assign two tasks to each firefighter, or you improve your interior advance techniques, that’s creative thinking. If you only opt in for a staffing model you will never attain, that is fantasy.

Benchmarks are a common form of fireground measurement. Here is a simple model for fire extinguishment. How much hose will be used on the interior of the building? If it’s on length ( 50′), then that is a staffing model. If twice that is needed, that is another. This is why the interior model doesn’t vary much. Getting the hose to the point of operation is typically the real variable that staffing impacts. Vertical and horizontal distances matter and often account for increased hoseline staffing both inside and outside the fire building. There is no need for two nozzle firefighters for a single hoseline but there is often a need for a door firefighter. The fire service needs to adapt and overcome its excuses and dreams and focus on the issues that impact operations and fireground lives by moving towards efficient extinguishment.

By Ray McCormack

Keep
Fire
In
Your
Life

Tactical Safety for Firefighters- False Positives

Ray

Tactical Safety for Firefighters

F A L S E
P O S I T I V E S

There is much talk in the fire service regarding how some pass downs have been proven wrong due to current research. In some categories, this legacy behavior has been explained utilizing a more scientific language which is one aspect of research. The other is how to avoid the legacy outcome regardless of what you label it now (hint : Better Engine Company LeadershIp).

Another aspect to be watched more closely is the false premises where a fire example is given along with a bad solution and now we fix it with a modern solution. The problem is if you were applying the original solution to the problem, then you didn’t understand basic firefighting anyway. So now we have SME’s (Subject Matter Experts) or a talking head who comes along with a new solution to fix it for you. You should have known this solution and you should be able to recognize silliness when you see it. The point is that some fire attack videos are giving you solutions to problems that should not have existed. Beware the peddler and their improved and enlightened ways. It’s only enlightening if you have had your head buried in the sand.

Get informed and pick up on what you’re being shown and just as importantly, what you’re not being shown.
If you want to improve the fire service, work on yourself first!

By Ray McCormack

Keep Fire in Your Life

Atlanta Fire Conference

Atlanta Fire Conference May 16, 17, & 18, 2014.

Still Spots available in the 8 Hour County Fire Tactics Hands-On. This is not to be MISSED CLASS. ONLY $50 for the Full Day Class

https://ezregister.com/register/order/8823/0/c65eb1e8141195ec6da7d3b2a972dc5d37d841f6/

We will cover everything from maximizing the hydrant, different supply line options, 1.75″ & 2″, 2.5″, Attack Lines, ADVANCED FORCIBLE ENTRY, with through the lock, VES, RIT Deployment, LADDERS, Vertical Ventilation, SEARCH, and Vertical Fire Attack. This will be a FULL DAY of training to include all necessary TACTICS for your next FIRE!!

Instructors to Include:

Lt. Ray McCormack, FDNY Ladder 28

FF Jim Smith, FDNY Squad 41

Chief Curt Isakson, Escambia County Fire Rescue

Chief Shannon Stone, Fort Walton Beach FD

Jason Martino, Palm Beach County Fire Rescue

Lt. Adam Bobe, Escambia County Fire Rescue

Lt. Norm Robinson, Escambia County Fire Rescue

Lt. Joel Richardson, Escambia County Fire Rescue

Lt. Matt Scallan, Escambia County Fire Rescue

Lt. Dan Kunz, Escambia County Fire Rescue

https://ezregister.com/register/order/8823/0/c65eb1e8141195ec6da7d3b2a972dc5d37d841f6/